News

Thanks to efforts by the Biden administration and AFSCME, many public service workers, 

This October, AFSCME Local 127 continued efforts to connect with our membership and advocate on its behalf... 

Many AFSCME members work in high-stress fields such as public safety, health care, emergency medical services and firefighting.

The Public Service Freedom to Negotiate Act was introduced today in the House of Representatives by Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-Pa.). The bill, which currently has 144 cosponsors, would set a minimum nationwide standard of collective bargaining rights that states must provide. It would empower workers to join together for a voice on the job not only to improve working conditions but to improve the communities in which they work.

Click on the link below to pull up the PDF version of the document. You can click on links in the PDF. 

PDF icon Fact Sheet on Prop B Rescission - October 2021

We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

*This notice was written to MEA members, but is relevant and useful for Local 127 members.*

Dear MEA Members,

Please take a breath and spend a few minutes to read and digest the following information related to the City’s Mandatory Vaccination Policy.

MEA recognizes that for over 80% of MEA-represented employees who are already fully vaccinated, this information will likely seem irrelevant -- but we encourage you to read and understand it and then share it with a colleague who has questions about the legality of what the City is doing.

Some of the nation’s largest cultural institutions accepted more than $1.6 billion in federal help to weather the coronavirus pandemic, but continued to let go of workers – even though the assistance was meant to shore up payrolls and keep workers on the job, according to a report released by AFSCME Cultural Workers United.

When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

“This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”